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GROUPOS DE AFINIDAD Y CONSEIO DE POATAVOCES...

Pedimos a todos los participantes en lo action que formen o se unan en un grupo de afinidad – un grupo autonomo compuesto par 5 a 15 personas, que incluyo personas que consideren el riesgo de  ser arrestadas y otras que lleven a cabo trabajo de apoyo, antes,  durante y despues de la accion. Los grupos de afinidad constituyen  la  unidad  basica  de  planificacion y loma  de decisiones de  las acetones en masa. Los grupos de afinidad se componen de personas que comparten ciertos principles, objetivos, intereses, etc. que los habilitan para trabajar bien juntos. Haz un grupo de afinidad con tus amigos, personas de tu comunidad, lugar de trabajo u organizacion. Dos o mas grupos de afinidad con valores comunes, o que quieran hacer acciones similares...

posted on: Dec 2, 2012 | author: organizingforpower

CONSENSO NO ES UNANIMIDAD

DECISIONES TOMADAS CON ESPÍRITU DE COOPERACIÓN by adaptado del texto de Randy Schutt ¿Qué es consenso? Â¿ Se trata de un proceso cooperativo por el cual las personas comparten sus mejores ideas y se llega a decisiones superiores o es un proceso coercitivo, manipulador y que hace perder tiempo, por el cual quienes son más  aguerridos, tienen mayor facilidad de palabra, o tienen más tiempo  disponible? ¿ O se trata de de una fantasía  idealista donde cada problema siempre tiene una solución simple que incorpora las ideas de todos (no importa cuán ridiculas sean) y satisface a todos por igual?   Consenso no es unanimidad Muchas personas piensan que el  consenso es tan simple  como un método de votación  extendido donde cada uno debe amoldar sus...

posted on: Dec 2, 2012 | author: organizingforpower

Clusters & Spokes Councils

Cluster A cluster is a grouping of affinity groups that come together to work on a certain task or part of a larger action. Thus, a cluster might be responsible for blockading an area, organizing one day of a multi-day action, or putting together and performing a mass street theater performance. Clusters could be organized around where affinity groups are from (example: Texas cluster), an issue or identity (examples: student cluster or anti-sweatshop cluster), or action interest (examples: street theater or lockdown). Spokes Councils A spokescouncil is the larger organizing structure used in the affinity group model to coordinate a mass action. Each affinity group (or cluster) empowers a spoke (representative) to go to a spokescouncil meeting to...

posted on: Dec 2, 2012 | author: organizingforpower

Coming Out of Jail Stronger

by Starhawk In the many times I’ve been to jail, here are some of the overwhelming responses I’ve noticed in myself and which you might be experiencing: Rage: Jail is simply the distilled form of the larger violence around us. Anger is a sane and healthy response, but you may find it deflected onto your friends and families instead of directed to the systems of oppression we’re fighting. Warn your friends and coworkers to tread gently and not order you around for a while. Be prepared for flashes of rage, and try to remember whom we’re really angry at. Self-Blame: You’ve been in a system designed on every level to make you feel bad, wrong, inadequate and powerless....

posted on: Dec 2, 2012 | author: organizingforpower

Sample Affinity Group Meeting Agenda

Pick a Facilitator Intros –Name and why you think participating in this action is important Introduction to the action – Who, what, when, where, how. Any Questions? Reportback from Spokescouncil – what actions are already happening? What intersections/buildings are already taken? Tactics go round – What tactics would you like to employ, is there anything you are not comfortable with? Target – What target would you like to take on, using what tactics? Resources – People, hardware, art, music, media, training. Brainstorm. Break it into things the affinity group can provide and things you might want to ask the working groups for help with, e.i. trainings or blockade tools. Decide on some Affinity Group Roles – The starred...

posted on: Dec 2, 2012 | author: organizingforpower

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